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of our operating revenue from membership dues f. you're not a member of the society, please join us or renew your membership today. i should note that anyone who joins or renews a membership today will receive a free autographed copy of our keynote speaker's new book, the title of which is martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr. we have a terrific program planned for you today. of course, the heart of the program will be our speaker, will be the remarks of our keynote speaker dr. claiborne parson. you have a program in front of you -- with you, and we will be following the program. we do have a number of members of the city's official family here with us today. the list of which i don't have and the number of community dignitaries. i see that we do have supervisor scott wiener, supervisor president of the board of supervisors david chiu, president cisneros, barbara garcia is with us. naomi is going to be part of the program. naomi kelly is with us, kim brandon from the port commission is with us, and a number of others. i'll be getting a list, i'll be ab
are wizards at using high-tech, high powered, high-tech phone systems. high-tech does nothing we cannot do. now fight to make the city and the bay safer. let's decide to choose life over death. the future is the funerals -- [inaudible] i look forward to working with you at the rainbow coalition in the coming days and san francisco bay area, oakland and let this be the place where we break down the cycle of violence and make this the place. [applause] if montgomery can do it for public accommodations, if cellma can do it and we can do it. choice of -- [inaudible] existence. dr. king and the whole year and we will have a safer peaceful environment. i wish to you that we have a happy holiday but let's work every sunday and then sunday to send and quest to demilitarize our society and jobs and drugs and guns out and let's choose another way. thank you very much. [applause] >> if we could have your attention for a few minutes. reverend jackson is catching a flight and why he's rushing out so if we could hold your attention for a few moment we would appreciate it. >> mike pappas from the i
, and it has carried us to our destination. have you ever wondered how elevators were -- work? we check out the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildi
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
taking an active role to intervene when we witness bullying. >> all of us are humbled by the virus, how systemic it's become. how do you get your hands around that? for me it's top down and bottom up. we are authority figures and what we do for our children and that's care, but we need to empower them to become the leaders they are waiting to become. this notion of youth adult partnership is esoteric in its term but on the ground how do you operationalize it, those things in the public school who are working so hard to meet the required mandates. schools are driven by mandates, academic achievement, achievement, enrollment. but the conditions in which the virus grows, if you follow the metaphor that bullying is a systemic virus, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better
is used widely across the country. it's in every state in the country and in canada and 70 countries around the world and programs we're familiar with is second step and i am hearing some nods and we have a -- idea of kind of what kind of things that we do, and i also do advocacy work so i come and speak at meetings like this. i was at the attorney general's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a cou
for and our caution to use zero tolerance and exclusionary discipline policies and also i teach teachers at san jose state and hundred students who are future teachers. >> can they do a projector? >> no. my teacher did, but again using social media, integrating all of the areas is so important for the prevention. thank you for that focus too and i think that gentleman has comments. >> i was going to follow up in the conversation with digital media or literacy needed within the educational system. we are still experiencing digital divide and access and just the one you speak of recently officer when you mention the generations and investigators not engaged with this media and no don't know my book or face space and when you have to look at youth culture. we talk about texting and sexing and omg and i didn't text anything to you. i spoke to and part of the language and how they engage so until we look at the culture of young people and how do we impact today's 20th century media culture we can't make a huge impact in regards to bullying or electronic aggression or whatever name we want
in chinatown or in district 3 there is someone that is always there with us, whether it's the broadway streetscape improvement, or the many projects that go on polk street or all around the neighborhood, please ask supervisor david chiu to say a few words >> good morning everyone, happy new year and happy new year of the mini dragon. i want to thank the chinese community coming together for today's announcement, as well as members of the honorary chinese community. this is a conversation that did start as i recall in one of the first meetings that i had with mayor lee when he was elected last year. we talked about how do we ensure that the oldest, historic and most amazing chinatown community in the country can continue to offer a new year's experience that is authentic and reflects the community? and i want to thank the city departments for working together for the pilot program. we learned from that and hope to build from that. special thanks to our dpw crew and our police department and our department of public health to make sure that our pedestrians are safe and our private se
help from people who are helping us create the policies and the accountability in all the different departments. melva davis, kim brandon, willie adams at the port, chuck collins, [speaker not understood], the reverend amos brown, denise tyson, linda richardson, sonya harris, patricia thomas, veronica honeycut, these are just the names of a few of our commissioners who are heading up those very important divisions of our city. and they are joining with me and with the supervisors and with the department heads to do what mrs. obama asked us to do. whenever we occupy these public positions throughout the city or throughout the state or throughout the nation, we do the right thing, we keep the doors of opportunity open and enriched for everybody else. and we're already seeing it happen. yesterday i was at the luncheon for the boys and girls club, wonderful, wonderful entity that's reaching out to all of our young high school kids and make sure they're motivated to go to college. you should have heard them talk about their futures. you should also hear them ask for our help, because i k
. we're also using those dollars to improve the quality of life, and as jackie spear pointed out plan for the future and economic prosperity of this whole area. when this subway extension opens as senator feinstein pointed out there will be 44,000 people using this light rail line. what she didn't point out that will make it the second or third busiest light rail in the united states. this is an environment that needs to be made and once it's built are gone the days when we have senior citizens watching the drive by and waiting for a bus that won't stop and then they have to stand on the bus and that bus has to crawl through the same traffic as the cars and get there in way too long period of time. means we will get into a elevator and on the rail and get to your destination in as little as eight minutes. for transit to succeed in the country it needs to be reliable and viable and we need it in the bay area reliable. muni has its challenges and bart is running the oldest rail cars in the united states right now. >> is it over? >> it's over. [applause] >> congratulations san franci
english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the
. the first place poster altogether for all of us to see. i would like to name everybody. community youth center of san francisco, the young asian women against violence youth participant jennifer chang. kimberly how. erica lam. allie lee. adriana wen (sounds like) diana -- and amy ung. congratulations everybody. (applause) (applause) (applause) good job everybody. thank you. and so at this time supervisor -- or do i give it back to -- nancy. thank you again. >> at this time we would like to call supervisor carmen chu. (applause) >> i think that is part of the program they wanted the winners to perhaps say a few words. >> thank you for choosing our picture. we were really surprised when you did. we are really happy. (applause) >> we were very surprised. thank you very much. (applause) >> i'm tiffany chung, so happy to be recognized in such a way. thank you very much. (applause) >> hi. i name is amy. thank you for letting us having this opportunity to make this poster and also recognize us. thank you. (applause) >> thank you. i want to thank mayor lee and the members of the collabor
solar for giving us this beautiful space to meet in today. is esther here? i haven't seen her. we'll thank her later. they made this space available for us. good morning, my name is me linda hague for those of you who don't know me. i was appointed by president obama a little more than two years ago to be united states attorney and it is my incredible honor to represent the president, the obama administration here in the northern district of california. welcome to the stop bullying summit. i'm a federal prosecutor so it may seem odd that here we are talking about bullying and we asked all of you to be here and i want to explain the origin of that and why this happened. you people, everybody in this room, has been involved in this issue and is doing incredible work on this issue and we were so honored to be a part of it and to meet with all of you and to speak with you about it. the origin is that as the united states attorney, the administration wants me, wants all the united states attorneys, to go out into the community. it's actually a very different role for the united sta
and john avalos' office, without her nobody would know what we were doing because she helps us with all of our fliers and everything that we need to do. john has been tireless. he comes to my house on fridays at 5:30 for meetings. he's a great, great supervisor and a champion for our district. and we're excited about this year. we're going to put in a park. we're going to do safety initiatives. we're looking for grant money for more beautification. if anybody is interested in starting a neighborhood watch and getting involved, call me and i can help you get started. it's a great thing to know your neighbors, even the ones who are a pain in the neck. it's a great thing to know your neighbors. [laughter] (applause) >> i would just like to say thank you to all of our neighbors because we have lived in that neighborhood for 37 years and it's just been such a joy to meet people who live right across the street and never knew what wonderful neighbors i had until we started the neighborhood watch group. so, i would strongly advise everyone to start a neighborhood watch group. it's great. and t
do they come from? >> we have no useful skills. i am dead serious. we have talked about this. 3o was t thing, and the code got crinkled, i could not do anything. >> the mental energy the other people are using to make useful products in the world, things that people need, we have spent our entire lives trying to amuse ourselves. that is all we know how to do. so we are better at it than people who have real jobs the them i think that is absolutely right. if you want to feed your family, let's say, you have to discipline yourself. there is also a way of looking at the world. once again, my friend larry david, he would take a little more salt and make a whole meal out of it. it is about looking at the world with a certain attitude. >> there are a lot of people who are funny and have a sense of humor, but they get sidetracked into productive work. we do not let that happen. [laughter] >> i am afraid we are out of time. as hard as it is to believe. [applause] >> thank you. >> i do not even think we can ask a final question because it would take us past our time. >> our thanks to dave
the contributions of folks while they're still with us. so, the lifetime achievement award is for someone we feel we should take this moment in time and thank in person for their contributions to the city. and i think we have this year's winner epitomizes the kind of person that we should take the time to acknowledge and to go further into that i'd like to actually take a moment and invite now our supervisor district 8 malia cohen who would like to share her opening thoughts on this award. (applause) >> can i just tell you how good it feels to be up here, to look out to see all the people that make everything possible, that really makes san francisco wonderful? and i just have got to give a special shout out. you knew i grew up in the portola for those that don't know. [cheering and applauding] >> right there at the intersection of silly man and colby, my parents still live there. that's where it started for me. but tonight is a night that we have abopportunity * to up lift and support and say thank you to all the people that certainly provide me support and provide me the motivation to get up and
away? >> i'm actually going to use an example that might seem a little far-flung for that question. one of the things i wanted to talk about with colleagues is the write up process when they cuss you out in the classroom or the hallway. i was in chicago in may and already the strike talk was coming up and talking to some of the teacher. one of the teachers said i don't know what to do about this bullying thing because the kids are cussing me out in the hallway and all i can do is write them up. i think that's a moment i'd like us to think about in terms of empowerment of the teacher. it might be the case that the teacher doesn't feel for a lot of different reasons that she can't depend on his principal to back her up and maybe that principal their best, too. but one of the things i want us it look at in terms of treating children with dignity, which means they are worthy, two things. respect as a word is overused in schools and if i could frankly take down all of the banners of in schools that say you have to respect yourselves, i would. because i think that kids see that and
awards here at san francisco city hall. thank you all so much for joining us here tonight. it is an honor to be here. my name is daniel homsby and i am the program manager for the neighborhood department networks. an honor to see you here. many of the same faces for the fifth year for the men awards. let's give you an a plays for coming back. (applause) >> and celebrating one of the most important things we have in san francisco, which is our neighborhoods. without further ado, i'd like to start the program off by introducing my colleague, christina palone, the new director for the mayor's office for neighborhoods. christina palone. (applause) >> good evening, everyone. i'm happy to be a part of such a great ebit that celebrates the contributions made by residents and organizations throughout the city to make san francisco one of the greatest places to live. the mayor's office of neighborhood services also known as mons focuses on neighborhood outreach and engagement. it is an honor to be here with community leaders who are dedicated to the same principles and are positive
us on the internet. i am from kcbs radio. your moderator. this is part of the good lit series. now it is my pleasure to introduce our special guest today, d and alan zweibel. they need no introduction. dave barry won the pulitzer prize for his insightful and funny commons -- columns in the miami herald, which he wrote for 21 years. is the best-selling author of more than 30 bucks, none of which has won the pulitzer prize. you may remember the tv series "and dave swirled," which was about his life. fortunately for us, his wife is running a lot longer than the tv show. he has written a show with alan zweibel. please welcome dave barry and alan zweibel. [applause] >> thank you. >> thank you for the fairly lengthy introduction. those are going to go first. i am dave. first of all, we're thrilled to be here at the commonwealth club. i want to tell you a little bit about myself. i live in miami. i moved there in 1986 from the united states. [laughter] one of the things i always feel like i should do is to defend my city because it had a bad reputation, a bad image. the zogby does this or
to address us on the vexing issue of bullying. it is my pleasure to introduce the mayor of san francisco, ed lee. . >> thank you, ann, for that wonderful introduction and i don't know where you got the ease of coming to the mayor's ofrs, there was no ease on that. ladies and gentlemen, thank you for joining together here at the presidio with all the different agencies. i see phil ginsburg, i know bill is around, others from our da office, richard caranza and others from the women's status as well and the district attorneys from the various counties, the school administrators and instructors and superintendents from other counties as well, as well as our community-based agencies that are so invaluable it all of us. this is a very important topic and it's one that our u.s. attorney, melinda hague and i helped spearhead yesterday with 800 students who came together who watch an incredible film by lee hirsch i've heard the wonderful reports from the kids, seen their laughter and their tears. we are going to honor your making that film by doing what we need to do to stop bullying across the co
of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don't change. so that is the human part, that is the part that should have consequences and not be ignored. otherwise the legislation really isn't doing what it's supposed to do, so thank you all very much. i really give a shout out to san francisco unified because they have been very, very on top of this issue, way ahead of the curv
for us was to make each other laugh. it was so much fun. it was live. so vital and vibrant. today i write novels and plays. it i am maliki, it comes out two years from now -- if i am lucky, it comes at two years from now. then i would write something monday, it was on television on saturday. i could write something saturday and it would be on tv that night. it was immediate. we would have rehearsal at 7:30 p.m. on saturday night. the rehearsal audience would come to the studio. between dress and air, we rewrites everything and then another audience comes in for the live show. i would go upstairs between the show's end of something on the news struck me as funny, i would write it and put it on "weekend update." it would be on half an hour later. two times, i was under the update desk, handing out jokes that i had written for them. [laughter] it was just so immediate. as far as what i think of it today, i think it is really good. i think seth myers and kristin wiig and fred armisten could have been on it in any era. i think every time you think it is over, you know, john lovitz comes along,
's the bullying that can come through the use of twitter, through the use of other social media. we did a case, again a hate crimes case involving an individual who called himself devilfish who over the internet was sending death threats to the heads of the national council of irasa to other organizations that had the audacity to october on behalf of immigrants. and we prosecuted him. you described one just now, that is not an isolated incident. you know that old addage, sticks and stones can break my bones but words can never hurt me, i categorically reject that. we have seen kids quite literally take their own lives as a result of cyber bullying and that is why i did a remarkable partnership in south florida with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands
brush, but it's something that encourages us to take action. i think in my prosecutors office there is hard and soft power. the hard power in a prosecutor's office, in a police department, it's arresting. it's putting in jail. it's going in court and find this person guilty and punish them. that's a kind of hard power and most of what is done in a prosecutor's office -- most of the resources are devoted to those hard power tasks, but although we devote less resources to soft power there are probably more important and soft power is where you change the hearts and minds of people. where you try to change cultures, try to change the norms in the community are and certainly in our office we devote significant resources to this. just a couple of examples. we have something called the parent project, and i am very grateful in a time of really reduced funding our board of supervisors stepped up and provided funding for otherwise what was run on a shoe string out of our office, and it's a program that teaches parents to be better parents and parents get referred this program th
that bind us together. ruslyn, does can urriculum need to change or is that not yet where you are. >> the federal government can't -- 10th amendment. >> change it. >> that would be federal overreach. >> well stated. >> no, but, but, so we are not funding or digging into can urriculum in that way. but you certainly have seen superintendent caranza happened about what happens with the kinds of conversations that happen with the movie bully and there are can urriculum packages being developed. i had visions, gary, to think about how if folks decided -- and we don't play in this -- but if folks decided there could be a class on this, how you teach, life skills class, right? if we try to make a one-size fits all click approach that doesn't really take people from where they are and get them to where they need to go. i have seen life skills work well and i have seen students literally filling out mcdonald's applications in their life skills class. so you can't just quickly eradicate and we can't just think about this in an isolated silo the link, for example, that has been alluded
on any page, and they can come right to us, but we've invented this thing, which is not the most brilliant invention but working well and the social resolution way to solve bullying and other harassing content, so we created a flow where you could say "hey, i don't like that piece of content" and instead of reporting to facebook ink and we have 3,000 people but we don't understand the context of everything going on. you can report to a family or friend or somebody off the site. >> in the context -- >> in the context of the behavior itself. we have seen the reports go down. the closing of the reports go up and when we surveyed the people both the person reported and the person reporting -- not everyone, but most of the people were very satisfied how it resolved itself. now just think about that. somebody said -- so it's like i say to anne "anne nice shirt. nice jacket. >> but you hate it. >> and i hate it or maybe i don't. i'm giving a complement. the thing is facebook inc. doesn't know the context but now we have a system in place and i can resolve to anne and anne could
's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a usa today story and suicide and especially among veterans right now and suicide is complex and we cannot send the message -- there is a lot of fear out there right now that bullying leads to suicide and suic
us. thank you so much for being here. (applause). >> assembly tom ammiano is here. (applause). >> and our state school chief tom torlichman is here and he is making his way to the podium. thank you all for being here. rob, i want to start with you. you are a los gatos man. how old was jill when this started happening. >> it started happening when jill was about 14, it started in december, she turned 15 in february and then less than a month later, she passed. >> i can't even imagine what that was like for you all. you have another daughter so you just couldn't fold so how did you deal with all that? >> that's one of the greatest challenges. you know, the devastation that jill went through, the pain, doesn't stop. families will testify it continues. it hits the community and now we have to continue to pull ourselves up and help our other daughter and the challenges of raising and parenting another child. you know, we can't just pull up in a shell. she has the right to have a childhood. she deserves to go to go to college. she deserves to be happy. we need to teach her
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win and a celebration for us all. >> to learn more about the helen diller playground in dolores park, go to sfrecpark.org.
. those are examples of on line mapping systems that can be used to find businesses or get driving directions or check on traffic conditions. all digital maps. >> gis is used in the city of san francisco to better support what departments do. >> you imagine all the various elements of a city including parcels and the critical infrastructure where the storm drains are. the city access like the traffic lights and fire hydrants. anything you is represent in a geo graphic space with be stored for retrieval and analysis. >> the department of public works they maintain what goes on in the right-of-way, looking to dig up the streets to put in a pipe. with the permit. with mapping you click on the map, click on the street and up will come up the nchgz that will help them make a decision. currently available is sf parcel the assessor's application. you can go to the assessor's website and bring up a map of san francisco you can search by address and get information about any place in san francisco. you can search by address and find incidents of crime in san francisco in the last 90 days
, they see our work process, our discussions, the decisions we make. it is good for us. we kind of behavior little bit when we have people in the audience. msk (music) >> we are rehearsing for our most expensive tour; plus two concerts here. we are proud that the growth of the orchestra, and how it is expanded and it is being accepted. my ambition when i came on as music director here -- it was evident we needed absolutely excellent work. also evident to me that i thought everyone should know that. this was my purpose. and after we opened, which was a spectacular opening concert about five weeks after that the economy completely crashed. my plan -- and i'm absolutely dogmatic about my plans --were delayed slightly. i would say that in this very difficult timefor the arts and everyone, especially the arts, it's phenomenal how new century has grown where many unfortunate organizations have stopped. during this period we got ourselves on national radio presence; we started touring, releasing cds, a dvd. we continue to tour. reputation grows and grows and grows and it has never stopped going f
, distinguished guests from the community, city family, all of us coming together. last year we held a pilot project on stockton street to help the merchants and support the merchants in selling their merchandise. we were able -- we were very successful. we got a lot of great feedback from the pilot. so this year again, we are doing the second year of the pilot. all the agencies and the community and the merchants, we got together, and talked about how we can do better. and without further delay, i will ask the mayor to come and say a few words, who is a big supporter of this project. mayor lee. >> thank you mohammed. [ applause ] >> i am very happy to be here. is this okay? all right. all right. [ laughter ] all right. first of all, happy new year to everyone. this is what i'm looking forward to every year and i know the merchants and residents and all the small businesses are excited. a year ago board of supervisors president david chiu and i and members of the community discussed how we can continue the economic vitality of the city and clearly we registered a big support for small
week and not know but it will be exciting. thank you for showing us this interesting technology. >> . >> golden gate parks largest body of water ska great labor for scrolling and picnicking and both miking which can both be rented at the boat house and the lakewood design for leisure boatings and carriages and a treasure trove passing hunting ton water falls two bridges connect the strawberry island and inclient to the hills the highest upon the in golden gate park and more than free hundred feet and you can catch glimpses will from the city at the top of a romantic look out and for
, and requested stops. and it is the law. >> i use the p a system to make sure everyone on the bus here is my announcements. >> i have had both experiences with the loudness and the to stop for the announcements. you are never going to have it exactly balanced for every trip because your level of noise changes. the announcement system ranges from 1 to 10. 10 would be too loud, a little distorted. eight is a good number. not too loud, but loud enough for everyone to hear and understand what is going on. >> i think bus drivers might not be aware of the fact that if you let a visually impaired person off at the wrong stop, number one, they may be absolutely unfamiliar with the area they are in. >> the driver overshot the stock that i wanted. i decided to get off and find my way back, but it was very disorienting, not exactly understanding how far i was. number 2, it might be a potentially dangerous situation if they do not know the area and are attempting to make crossings that they are unfamiliar with. >> they let me off somewhere else. i had no idea where i was. i missed the stop, and the bus
of activities, including basketball, line dancing, playing ping-pong, and arts and crafts. >> use it for whatever you want to do, you can do it here. >> on friday, november 16th, the dedication and ribbon cutting took place at the sunset playground and recreation center celebrating its renovation. it was raining, but the rain clearly did not dampen the spirits of the dignitaries, community members, and children in attendance. [cheering and applauding] ♪ ♪ >> hey, san franciscans, here with the weekly buzz. it's the first week in february, and we have things that won't break the bank, they for all free. this tuesday, february 5 is free admission date for top museums. the dm and the leg end of honor. and after the trip to the museum, take a trip to the zoo, and offering free admission to residents. enjoy seeing all species in their surroundings, and other activities throughout the day. and if you are a baseball fan, i have a giant treat for you, this saturday at at&t park. the event will feature autographed sessions with the players and a chance to take pictures with the one and
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